Temples Sightseeing

Blog

Bangkok

Temples in Bangkok
Only a few of Bangkok's hundreds of Buddhist temples (or wats) are particularly interesting to tourists. When King Taksin led his troops out of Ayutthaya and into Thonburi in 1767 CE, they sought refuge at Wat Arun.

Must-Visit-Temples-In-Bangkok

Must-Visit Temples In Bangkok

November 21, 2022

The Grand Palace, which has housed Thailand's monarchs for over 200 years, is the King's official residence. It houses ChakriMahaprasat Hall and Wat Phra Kaew, which houses the Emerald Buddha and is considered Thailand's most important temple. The more modern Chitralada Palace, on the other hand, is the actual Bangkok residence of the reigning monarch, King Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), and his Queen Sirikit.

Temples in Bangkok
Only a few of Bangkok's hundreds of Buddhist temples (or wats) are particularly interesting to tourists. When King Taksin led his troops out of Ayutthaya and into Thonburi in 1767 CE, they sought refuge at Wat Arun.

Wat Phra Chetuphon Wimon Mangkhalaram Ratchaworamahawihan (Wat Pho)

Wat Pho: The Temple of the Reclining Buddha, also known as Wat Phra Chetuphon, is located south of the Temple of the Emerald Buddha and the Grand Palace. It is Bangkok's largest temple and houses a massive gold-leaf-covered reclining Buddha figure 46 meters (151 feet) long. The feet alone measure 3 meters (10 feet).

Another highlight is a large collection of ancient Chinese sculptures such as ancient warriors, lions, and even a statue of Marco Polo, the first foreign explorer to visit China, among other things.

View the "Phra Maha Chedi Si Rajakarn" group of four massive pagodas surrounded by a white wall with Thai-Chinese-style sheltered gates.
Phra Maha Chedi Sri Sanpetdayarn is the one with the green tile mosaic.
The one with a white tile mosaic represents King Rama II's reign.
The one with the yellow tile mosaic represents King Rama III's reign.
The final one, in a dark blue tile mosaic, depicts King Rama IV the Great's reign.


The Temple is open daily from 8 a.m. to 18.30 p.m.

Wat Arun Ratchawararam (Temple Of Dawn)
Wat Arun is a royal temple of King Rama II, also known as King Buddha Loetla Nabhalai of the Chakri Dynasty. It dates back to the Ayutthaya period. Its stupa was regarded as one of the most beautiful and massive stupas of the time.

Wat Arun's stupas were built with white bricks and decorated with many valuable materials, including seashells, porcelain, and many Benjarong dishes, the majority of which came from China. Furthermore, sculptures such as Kinnari, giants, angels, and garudas can be found throughout the Temple. Another must-do activity is a photo with the two temple guardians: Tossakan, King of Krung Long Ka, and Sahatsadecha, King of Pang Tan City. Both demons are extremely powerful.

The Temple is open daily from 8 a.m. to 17.30 p.m

Wat Benchamabophit (The Marble Temple)
Wat Benchamabophit (The Marble Temple): With multi-tiered roofs, elegant bird-like decorations (chofahs), and stunning gold carvings, it is a fine example of Bangkok's architectural style. The temple is guarded by two large stone lions, one on each side of the entrance. Inside is a magnificent Sukhothai-style Buddha statue that is a replica of the original Phra Buddha Chinnarat in Phitsanulok, northern Thailand.

Wat Trai Mit Witthayaram Worawihan
The solid gold Sukhothai-style Buddha known as the seated Phra Phuttha Maha Suwana Patimakon, certified by the Guinness World Records in 1991, is what tourists should come to see with their own eyes in this Temple. The statue is now on the fourth floor of Wat Traimit's new Phra Maha Mondop building. The second and third floors house an exhibition about the origins of this Buddha statue and the history of Bangkok's Chinatown. Don't forget to pay a visit to the great Buddha image, "Phra Phuttha Tossapol Yarn," before leaving the temple.

The Temple is open daily from 8 a.m. to 17 p.m.